Wednesday , 24 May 2017
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What I’ve learnt about the Samsung Bada Platform

A few weeks ago, I attended the Samsung Bada Developer Conference in Singapore. I learnt a lot about the Bada platform and here are my findings.

  • Bada is focusing on the the middle/low end market, competing with Symbian’s market share.
  • Bada platform will not compete with Samsung’s Android product line which is the high end market.
  • Developer Support – http://bit.ly/aWklLW and App Store –http://bit.ly/aOQhOO
  • Kies is an app for the PC to access Samsung Apps – downloaded here – http://bit.ly/aptQ3C
  • SamsungApps gives you the standard 70/30 split on the profits.
  • Submitting a Samsung App takes on average 3-4, up to 7 business days. No developer subscription fee.
  • Samsung will provide complete detailed reasons with pics, videos, etc why your app is rejected, and work with you to get your app approved.
  • Bada SDK only works for Windows platform and the Bada IDE is based on Eclipse.
  • You use C++ to develop on Bada.
  • Bada is Single Tasking. But you can save state and reload state upon termination and initialization.
  • “Multi-tasking” works if it is from your Bada App to Base App like answer calls, messages, etc.
  • Bada API does not use Exceptions at all. It’s all based on your vanilla C-style error handling.
  • However, you can use Exceptions handling on your own application.
  • Bada has a buddy feature.
  • Bada uses a Samsung’s web browser based on Webkit.
  • Bada has an in-app purchase ready for you to integrate and use.

I hope that answers most of your questions on Samsung Bada. It did for me.

About Justin Lee

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3 comments

  1. The most interesting question: why would I want to develop for Bada? Plain C is a pain in the neck. Both ObjectiveC (iPhone/iPad) and Java (Android) seem to be easier (at least from a “programming robust applications perspective), multi-platform (the IDE, not the target environment) and aim at larger (and probably more spend-thrift) audience.

    What’s your take?
    .-= Stephan H. Wissel´s last blog ..Ease your Notes Client Rollout =-.

  2. My take is, because it is such a new platform, any application you write will be the first on the platform, thus capturing the market. However, since it is a different market from iPhone and Android, the target will be those symbian developers to move to bada instead as the platform of the future.

    But I don’t deal with the lower-end markets, so I doubt I’ll develop on Bada. We’ll have to see.

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